Hip Bones and a Slender Waist

“Right before you head out running, it can be hard to remember exactly why you’re doing it. You often have to override a nagging sense of futility, lacing up your shoes, telling yourslef that no matter how unlikely it seems right now, after you finish you will be glad you went. It’s only afterward that it makes sense, although even then it’s hard to rationalize why. You just feel right. After a run, you feel at one with the world, as though some unspecified, innate need has been fulfilled.”
— Adharanand Finn, (via isensearunner)
lukeschuetrumpf:

Dominique Elisa 

Photo: Luke Schuetrumpf

lukeschuetrumpf:

Dominique Elisa

Photo: Luke Schuetrumpf

(via thin-to-fit-in)

a-health-and-fitness-blog:

Try these tips from fitsugar to become a faster runner. 
Fuel up: Eating the right pre-run foods is important to prevent feeling sluggish during your run. Go for foods that won’t cause cramps: choose a small snack of simple carbs with a little bit of protein if you’re eating right before a run (read more on how to choose a pre-workout snack here). And drink a cup of coffee about a half hour before you go for a run; studies have shown that caffeine helps you run faster and longer.
Intervals: Short sprinting bursts are great for making you a better runner all around. Up your pace and stamina with this treadmill interval workout to incorporate into your running routine.
Tempo runs: Tempo runs are similar to high-intensity intervals, but with this strategy, you don’t sprint as fast as you can. Instead, you hold at a fast (but not too fast) pace for a longer time period, like 10 minutes, before slowing down. This helps your muscles get past your lactate threshold, which will help you improve your endurance and speed. Remember that to be effective, your tempo run should challenge your body: you should be able to answer short questions but unable to hold a conversation. Try doing a tempo run every seven to 10 days; read more about how to start tempo running here.
Hills: There’s no reason you should stay on flat land. In fact, there are many reasons why you shouldn’t. Running up hills helps make your leg muscles stronger while also increasing your speed and endurance. Whether you run on the treadmill or outside, the next time you start your workout, make sure an incline is part of your route. This 40-minute treadmill hill workout incorporates steep, short inclines to help you improve your speed and endurance.
Post-run sprints: Adding short sprinting strides at the end of a long run can keep your body primed for speed, says Sports Club/LA trainer Ben Hwa. This is because doing strides after a long run will teach your body how to run fast even when your legs are tired. Ben recommends doing four to eight strides of 70 to 100 meters; aim for 80 percent effort on each stride.
Negative splits: This strategy is a simple way to make every run a good run, especially on race day. To incorporate a negative split into your next run, just make sure you’re running at a good, steady pace and increase your speed for the second half of your run.
Stretches: You may not think of post-run stretching as important for your pace goals, but those few minutes you spend cooling down can really help your speed. Stretching makes you more flexible, which can improve your stride and range of motion. Do these post-run stretches after your workout to become a faster runner.
Short strides: Shorter strides can make you a more efficient, and therefore speedier, runner, says trainer Jennifer Pattee. Focus on keeping your strides regular and short to increase your running efficiency.
Midfoot strike: Focusing on landing on the middle of your foot — rather than your heels or toes — can also help you avoid injuries and discomfort that will slow you down, Jennifer adds. Aim for striking with a flat foot for a strong, confident strike.
Drills: Adding a few running drills to your warmup routine will help improve your running form and speed, Ben says. Do a few minutes of high knees, skipping, and backward running before a run to train your body to operate properly.” - Fitsugar.com

a-health-and-fitness-blog:

Try these tips from fitsugar to become a faster runner. 

Fuel up: Eating the right pre-run foods is important to prevent feeling sluggish during your run. Go for foods that won’t cause cramps: choose a small snack of simple carbs with a little bit of protein if you’re eating right before a run (read more on how to choose a pre-workout snack here). And drink a cup of coffee about a half hour before you go for a run; studies have shown that caffeine helps you run faster and longer.

Intervals: Short sprinting bursts are great for making you a better runner all around. Up your pace and stamina with this treadmill interval workout to incorporate into your running routine.

Tempo runs: Tempo runs are similar to high-intensity intervals, but with this strategy, you don’t sprint as fast as you can. Instead, you hold at a fast (but not too fast) pace for a longer time period, like 10 minutes, before slowing down. This helps your muscles get past your lactate threshold, which will help you improve your endurance and speed. Remember that to be effective, your tempo run should challenge your body: you should be able to answer short questions but unable to hold a conversation. Try doing a tempo run every seven to 10 days; read more about how to start tempo running here.

Hills: There’s no reason you should stay on flat land. In fact, there are many reasons why you shouldn’t. Running up hills helps make your leg muscles stronger while also increasing your speed and endurance. Whether you run on the treadmill or outside, the next time you start your workout, make sure an incline is part of your route. This 40-minute treadmill hill workout incorporates steep, short inclines to help you improve your speed and endurance.

Post-run sprints: Adding short sprinting strides at the end of a long run can keep your body primed for speed, says Sports Club/LA trainer Ben Hwa. This is because doing strides after a long run will teach your body how to run fast even when your legs are tired. Ben recommends doing four to eight strides of 70 to 100 meters; aim for 80 percent effort on each stride.

Negative splits: This strategy is a simple way to make every run a good run, especially on race day. To incorporate a negative split into your next run, just make sure you’re running at a good, steady pace and increase your speed for the second half of your run.

Stretches: You may not think of post-run stretching as important for your pace goals, but those few minutes you spend cooling down can really help your speed. Stretching makes you more flexible, which can improve your stride and range of motion. Do these post-run stretches after your workout to become a faster runner.

Short strides: Shorter strides can make you a more efficient, and therefore speedier, runner, says trainer Jennifer Pattee. Focus on keeping your strides regular and short to increase your running efficiency.

Midfoot strike: Focusing on landing on the middle of your foot — rather than your heels or toes — can also help you avoid injuries and discomfort that will slow you down, Jennifer adds. Aim for striking with a flat foot for a strong, confident strike.

Drills: Adding a few running drills to your warmup routine will help improve your running form and speed, Ben says. Do a few minutes of high knees, skipping, and backward running before a run to train your body to operate properly.” - Fitsugar.com

(via runningofsummits)

fit-personality:

Hydrating for short runs and interval runs:
Running specific water bottles: Holding a water bottle can be annoying as hell when it’s slipping out of your hand because it’s sweating more than you are, so you essentially spend your run playing some sick version of hot potato with your bottle instead of having a good run. But water bottles like these and these are made specifically for runs and they keep the water cold and the bottle doesn’t sweat, which is perfect for shorter runs.
Fuel belts: If you don’t like holding anything while you run, you can get fuel belts, which have mini bottles attached on them. I personally don’t like these because I feel like they are restrictive on my waist, but to each her own, some girls are dtf (down to fuelbelt).
Track workouts: If you don’t like holding anything but still feel like you need hydration on an interval workout, do the interval workout on a track. You can keep the water on the side and get drinks when you need, but you don’t have to worry about holding it. Wow what a world we live in! What a time to be alive!
Hydrating for long distance runs:
Wanna be really edgy and unpredictable. Shock your friends and stay cool with these alternatives. Running long distance and getting dehydrated is way to easy, so having access to water especially in the summer is super important. Doing all this as well as staying hydrated when you aren’t running is necessary.
If you start getting dizzy while you are midway through your run. Don’t be a dumbass. STOP. You will pass out and you will go to the hospital and like I get that you want to have a good workout but you also shouldn’t have to pay ridiculous medical bills from the ER.
Hydrating throughout the week:
Always have a water bottle with you so it becomes routine for you to constantly be drinking water.
If you don’t like the taste of water, you’re wrong. But also, put fruit in it, it will help mask the taste.
Have green tea with your breakfast. Metabolism booster AND water? I don’t even care if you don’t think it tastes good. You’re wrong and you should drink it.
Have coconut water and other natural electrolyte drinks throughout the day.
Have lots of fruit. All the best fruits are in season in the summer and coincidentally also contain a ton of water! Pee on, my friends.
Point of this is, don’t be one of those people that gets dehydrated and passes out while running this summer. Don’t kill that runner vibe. Drink on.

fit-personality:

Hydrating for short runs and interval runs:

  • Running specific water bottles: Holding a water bottle can be annoying as hell when it’s slipping out of your hand because it’s sweating more than you are, so you essentially spend your run playing some sick version of hot potato with your bottle instead of having a good run. But water bottles like these and these are made specifically for runs and they keep the water cold and the bottle doesn’t sweat, which is perfect for shorter runs.
  • Fuel belts: If you don’t like holding anything while you run, you can get fuel belts, which have mini bottles attached on them. I personally don’t like these because I feel like they are restrictive on my waist, but to each her own, some girls are dtf (down to fuelbelt).
  • Track workouts: If you don’t like holding anything but still feel like you need hydration on an interval workout, do the interval workout on a track. You can keep the water on the side and get drinks when you need, but you don’t have to worry about holding it. Wow what a world we live in! What a time to be alive!

Hydrating for long distance runs:

  • Wanna be really edgy and unpredictable. Shock your friends and stay cool with these alternatives. Running long distance and getting dehydrated is way to easy, so having access to water especially in the summer is super important. Doing all this as well as staying hydrated when you aren’t running is necessary.
  • If you start getting dizzy while you are midway through your run. Don’t be a dumbass. STOP. You will pass out and you will go to the hospital and like I get that you want to have a good workout but you also shouldn’t have to pay ridiculous medical bills from the ER.

Hydrating throughout the week:

  • Always have a water bottle with you so it becomes routine for you to constantly be drinking water.
  • If you don’t like the taste of water, you’re wrong. But also, put fruit in it, it will help mask the taste.
  • Have green tea with your breakfast. Metabolism booster AND water? I don’t even care if you don’t think it tastes good. You’re wrong and you should drink it.
  • Have coconut water and other natural electrolyte drinks throughout the day.
  • Have lots of fruit. All the best fruits are in season in the summer and coincidentally also contain a ton of water! Pee on, my friends.

Point of this is, don’t be one of those people that gets dehydrated and passes out while running this summer. Don’t kill that runner vibe. Drink on.

(via runningofsummits)

candice-angel-swanepoel:

candice swanepoel // victoria’s secret fashion show 2011-2013

(via thin-to-fit-in)